Federal trucking regulators have recently announced that, in 2015, the rate of random drug testing for truckers will be maintained at 50 percent. While drivers of tractor-trailers, buses and other qualifying commercial vehicles will continue to face the same rates of randomized drug testing this year, officials at the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) have noted that their decision to not change drug testing for truckers has been based on:

  • Data from previous’ years drug testing for truckers
  • The 2012 Drug and Alcohol Testing Survey conducted by the FMCSA
  • Other investigations.

Findings from Past Drug Testing for Truckers

Randomized drug testing for truckers will remain at a rate of 50 percent in 2015, the FMCSA recently announced. Here’s why. Contact us if you’ve been hurt in a truck accident.

Randomized drug testing for truckers will remain at a rate of 50 percent in 2015, the FMCSA recently announced. Here’s why. Contact us if you’ve been hurt in a truck accident.

Taking a look at the following findings from the above-noted FMCSA data can shed some light on how federal trucking regulators came to their decision to maintain the 50 percent drug testing for truckers in 2015:

  • From 2011 to 2012, the rate at which tested truckers showed up positive for drug use after failing an initial drug test increased by more than 4 percent.
  • From 2010 through 2012, federal officials have extrapolated that the rates of positive drug testing for truckers (i.e., tests revealing drugs in truckers’ systems) increased by about five times.
  • In nearly 1 out of every 4 FMCSA compliance investigations conducted over the past few years, violations related to the use of controlled substances and/or alcohol were reportedly an issue.
  • Independent labs certified by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reported an increase in positive drug tests from 2011 to 2012 to the DOT, with the positive rate jumping from 95,427 (positive drug tests in 2011) to 97,332 (positive drug tests in 2012). About 80 percent of these tests involved individuals who worked in FMCSA-regulated industries.
  • The FMCSA’s 2014 Strike Force investigation resulted in more than 200 commercial drivers in the U.S. being identified as testing positive for drug and/or alcohol use while “on duty.” These included commercial drivers responsible for transporting passengers and hazardous materials.

Denver Truck Accident Lawyer at the Cederberg Law Firm

Have you or a loved one been injured in a truck accident – or in any type of motor vehicle accident? If so, it’s time to contact a Denver truck accident lawyer at the Cederberg Law Firm to find out more about your best options for financial recovery.

Having overseeing countless cases in their 35 years’+ experience, our attorneys have a deep understanding of the law, as well as the legal experience you need, and they can fiercely defend your rights in any legal setting.